Tanzania acid inorwisa inokanganisa kushanya

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Last week Wednesday two British tourists Katie Gee and Kirstie Trup, both aged 18, were reportedly attacked with Acid by two men who were riding a motorbike as they walked through the streets of Unguj

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Last week Wednesday two British tourists Katie Gee and Kirstie Trup, both aged 18, were reportedly attacked with Acid by two men who were riding a motorbike as they walked through the streets of Unguja the legendary historical Stone Town in Tanzania.

Arusha City is gateway to the country’s leading tourism destinations including Mount Kilimanjaro, the Ngorongoro Crater and Serengeti National Park while Zanzibar is the global choice for beach tourism.

The Arusha-based Tanzania Association of Tour Operators has issued statement against the recent acid attack on two British teenage volunteers in Zanzibar, saying the incident will adversely affect tourism.

“We always market Tanzania as the ‘Land of Kilimanjaro, Ngorongoro, Serengeti and Zanzibar,” pointed out Mr. Mustafa Akonaay the Executive Secretary of TATO adding that the incident in which the two volunteer teachers were attacked with acid by in the isles will stain one of the industry’s trademarks.

Some corrosive liquid was splashed over their faces, chests, backs and hands burning them badly. The girls, who have already been flown back to London, underwent initial treatment in Dar-es-salaam where President Jakaya Kikwete paid them a visit in hospital.

By mid this week no arrests have been made in Zanzibar with regard to the attack. Zanzibar Commissioner of police Musa Ali Musa told Radio One in an interview that a number of people had been questioned concerning the attack but still they had no suspect.

But as far as the TATO official is concerned the incident wasn’t just an attack on innocent foreigners but rather some underground mechanism to sabotage the country’s tourism because in the course of this year somewhat similar attacks were experienced in Arusha which is the epicenter of the travel industry.

“There have been series of attacks on church buildings, religious leaders in the Isles. Later the religious house attacks moved to Arusha where a church was bombed,” said Mr. Akonaay adding that the incidents only seem to occur in tourism sites.

At the moment TATO is worried that should the United Kingdom issue a travel advisory in the wake of the acid attack, Tanzania is set to lose a lot.

Mr. Akonaay called for thorough investigations on both the Zanzibar and Arusha incidents saying they were neither religious nor politically affiliated but rather all those attacks were clearly targeting Tanzania, especially the country’s fast growing tourism industry.

A statement by the British High Commissioner, Dianna Melrose dated August 14 says: “Pending police investigations, it would be unwise to leap to conclusions about the motive for the attack or what it means for foreign investors. Nevetherless, we have updated our Travel Advice to inform people of the attack and to reiterate the need for caution.”

At the moment Tanzania attracts more than one million foreign visitors per year and the number is expected to double in few years’ time. While the country’s mainland remains the pinnacle of adventurous wildlife safaris, the Zanzibar Island was on the other hand fast emerging as the ultimate destination for beach tourism.

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